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Ethics

Ethics Between Law and Religion Opinion Essay

June 10, 2022 by Essay Writer

Introduction

Ethics refers to moral behavior that is acceptable to a particular society. Seglin defines ethics as a set of moral issues that are regarded to be righteous (4). Given a narrower perspective, ethics can be considered as an act of doing what the society expects at the right time and in the right manner. However, ethics can be viewed from a wider perspective.

In this regard, it can be viewed as a meta-ethics, normative ethics, applied ethics, moral psychology and descriptive ethics. Whichever way one views ethics from, this is the morality in actions of an individuals or a group of individuals.

The current society is very sensitive on issues that pertain to morals. Many organizations consider ethics as a basic requirement that its members must consider when conducting their daily duties. It is a requisite for any institution that hopes to achieve its set objectives within a set time line.

Ethics in Law and Religion

Ethics cuts across different institutions, each with its own specifications of what it takes to be considered ethical.

Law and ethics may not go hand in hand in most of the cases. What the law may demand of an individual may be considered as unethical to the society. Law may demand that an individual make a confession against a friend or family member, act in line with some demands that may force one to hit back, or such other actions that may result in one being viewed as not considerate to others plight.

In law, ethics is viewed as practices that are in line with legislation of a given country or state. Professionals such as lawyers, doctors, marketers, engineers among others have a code of conduct that is expected of them. This is called professional or legal ethics. As a representative to his or her clients, a lawyer is expected to respect the privacy that may be due to the client.

He or she should be a representative who is trustworthy either financially or otherwise. Ethics in law is of benefit to the professionals and their clients. A lawyer who maintains ethics is likely to attract more clients to his or her firm. The clients will be assured of a standard service, without the fear of fraud from the service provider.

However, ethics may not work well in some cases. One may fail to deliver justice if ethics is considered. There may be a case that demands for a punishment that the society considers unethical, but one which delivers justice. Therefore, one may be forced to sacrifice justice for ethics.

Religion refers to a set of beliefs of a given group of people. Ethics in religion may be defined as acting according to the beliefs and practices of a given religion (Badaracco 51). The world is characterized by a variety of religious groups, each with different doctrines. The Muslim religion has a very strict code of conduct expected of the followers of both gender.

This is in regard to dress code and other behavioral factors. Religion, unlike law, emphasizes on doing what society considers right, regardless of its standings in a court of law. The church emphasizes on forgiveness as one of the best form of ethics in society, a fact that may not be the case if law is to be followed.

According to most religions, law is the guide to the society. However, it should not be viewed as a source of oppression to mankind. For this reason therefore, what may be considered as ethical before the law, may be very unethical to a given religion.

Ethics is of benefit to religion. It ensures that a given religious group stays in cohesion, always seeing each other as a brother. However, ethics may be a source of punishment to the believers. What a religious group considers ethical may be oppressive to a section of that religious group.

Works Cited

Badaracco, Joseph. Defining Moments: When Managers Must Choose Between the Right and the Right. Massachusetts: Harvard Business School Press, 1997. Print.

Seglin, Jeffrey. The Right Thing: Conscious, Profit and Personal Responsibility in Today’s Business. New York: Spiro Press, 2003. Print.

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